PanicAttackSymptoms.org.uk

Piecing it all Together

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For anyone suffering regular panic attack symptoms, the fight or flight response is often triggered suddenly and out of the blue.

In an instant, a severe bout of fear & anxiety floods through the body and panic attack symptoms appear without warning and for no apparent reason

The central nervous system sends an overdrive of nervous impulses from the brain to various parts of the body as both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems go haywire.

With palpitations and hyperventilation come blood chemistry changes and a range of complex reactions take place caused by hormonal release from both brain and adrenal gland.

Lasting anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes, these episodes often come in waves and sometimes it feels like our panic attack symptoms go on for hours and in extreme cases they actually do.

The key to controlling this reaction is to try and do anything you can to calm your body; with the exception of drinking alcohol or taking recreational drugs, which can make the attack worse!

Relaxation, breathing, distraction, visualisation, meditation, anything you can do to get your mind to change focus, will help reduce the frequency of the waves of panic attack symptoms allowing them to eventually subside.

Whilst infrequent episodes of the panic attack symptoms are harmless if uncomfortable, prolonged exposure to the fight or flight stress response responsible for the panic attack symptoms you feel is not healthy and can lead to an increased susceptibility to life threatening conditions.

It is critical to get help, you must do whatever you can to obtain self help books or DVD's, enrol for online courses and get therapy, whether you can afford private healthcare or not.

So many people say that they cannot afford to spend money controlling their panic attack symptoms, but if your symptoms are persistent ….. you really cannot afford not to!


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